Type II. Diabetes

Patients became insulin free for varying lengths of time. Fasting plasma glucose and 2‑h postprandial blood glucose levels were relatively stable in all the patients following transplantation

Although complexity and heterogeneity exist in the pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), the disease is characterized by progressive and inexorable β-cell dysfunction, which subsequently leads to insulin defiiency. The β-cell failure is central to the development and progression of T2D, particularly during the later stages of the disease. Insulin secretion decreases due to the glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity effects on pancreatic β‑cells. Thus, intense research has focused on possible mechanisms to promote the expansion of existing pancreatic β-cells and β‑cell development from either endogenous or exogenous stem cells. C‑peptide levels are considered to be a critical indicator of the efficacy of novel therapies for T2D.

Since genetic and environmental risk factors are involved in human T2D, transplantation of endogenous or exogenous stem cells may be beneficial for patients with diabetes. Transplantation of allogeneic Umbilical Cords Mesenchymal Stem Cells may be an approach to improve islet function in patient with T2D

9 month follow-up after treatment

1) Insulin dose decrease: 3.6 ±1.7 unit
2) Blood glucose concentration decrease: in average 23.2 (-9 ~ -145) Patients 1, 2, 3 and Control 1 and3 : Hypoglycemic agents
Patients 4 and 5, and Control 2 : Insulin (Pt. 5 : Insulin pump)

Pt # Before T
x
Post Tx
1M
Post Tx
2M
Post Tx
3M
Post Tx
4M
Post Tx
5M
Post Tx
6M
Post Tx
7M
Post Tx
8M
Post Tx
9M
1 220 180 140 110 102 95* 109 98* 112 130
2 155 138 111 90* 108 102 96* 111 114 124
3 167 130 106 94* 106 109 102 107 116 118
4 107 98* 113 105 90* 110 99* 108 110 114
5 102 94* 105 93* 98* 102 100 107 112 103
Cont1 153 149 169 151 132 164 157 155 136 151
Cont2 118 120 117 121 119 125 120 115 122 120
Cont3 162 158 125 156 149 135 154 139 132 150
foot1
foot2
foot3
foot4

Before & After of stem cell treatment on diabetes mellitus foot
Blood flow in the peripheral vessels becomes blocked as a result of diabetic complications, thus creating a diabetic foot.